NEW MEXICO STATE UNIVERSITY AT CARLSBAD
SURVEY OF GEOLOGY - GEOLOGY 111G

SPRING 2001

MW: 1:00 pm to 3:45 pm
(Lecture/Lab)

INSTRUCTOR:
Gayle D'Mura

OFFICE:
Room 234

PHONE:
234-9345

E-MAIL:
gdmura@cavern.nmsu.edu

OFFICE HOURS:
before and after class (or by appointment)

CLASSROOM:
Lecture: Room 235
Lab: Room 232

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Survey of Geology is a study of the minerals, rocks, and processes which form and modify the earth. It is an introductory level course covering earth materials, plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, mountain building, weathering, streams, glaciers, and wind. As a result of this course the student will gain an understanding of how these factors affect our earth. This course applies toward the NMSU General Education Basic Natural Sciences requirement.

PRE-REQUISITES:
None

TEXTBOOKS:
These textbooks are required for this course.

Essentials of Geology, 7th Ed., by Frederick Lutgens and Edward Tarbuck

Exploring Geology, 1st Ed., by Shannon O'Dunn and William Sill


GRADUATE OUTCOMES:
The successful completion of this course will partially fulfill the following graduate outcomes:

Effective communication through reading, writing, listening, & speaking
Problem solving skills
Critical/creative thinking skills
Awareness of the sciences
Collaborative working skills
Basic computer skills
Computation skills
Effective and responsible interaction in society

COURSE OBJECTIVES/OUTCOMES:
  1. Lectures will be presented to introduce new material.
  2. Appropriate films and slides will be shown as available.
  3. Laboratory will include identification of rocks and minerals, map reading, interpretation of geologic cross-sections, geologic mapping, and stream tables.

    PERFORMANCE MEASURES AND GRADING:
    Students are responsible for procedures and policies contained and addressed in the NMSU-C student handbook and catalog.

    GRADES:
    All assignments receive a grade as follows:

    number of points earned
    number of points possible

    To calculate a grade for an individual assignment:
    1) Multiply # of points earned by 100
    2) Divide by # of points possible


    GRADING SCALE:
    A = 90 - 100 %
    B = 80 - 89 %
    C = 70 - 79 %
    D = 60 - 69 %
    F = 0 - 59 %

    Approximate weighting:
    Tests: 50 %
    Homework: 15 %
    Laboratory: 25 %
    Magazine Summary: 5 %
    Attendance: 5 %

    TESTS:
    There will be 5 tests, worth 100 points each. There will also be a comprehensive final exam which may be used to take the place of the lowest previous test score. This use is optional, and carries no penalty for trying (if the grade for the final is lower it doesn't count).

    All make-up tests are essay format. Arrangements for a make-up test must be made before the scheduled test date, and are subject to instructor approval. Make-up tests must be taken within one week, or the comprehensive final exam becomes the make-up test.

    Test questions will primarily cover material from lecture, but may also include lab-related questions, and will consist of some combination of multiple choice, true or false, matching, and/or short answer.

    HOMEWORK:
    The course outline in this syllabus includes all reading and homework assignments from the text that will be given. Each chapterís assignment is worth 10 points. WARNING: Don't ignore the homework! Each assignment may not seem worth much, but the total adds up quickly!

    Homework may be turned in at any time, allowing you to set your own pace, but is due no later than the day of the test covering that material. Late assignments will receive a maximum of half credit.

    LABORATORY:
    Attendance at laboratory sessions is required. Most of the work on these will be done during the class period. Each lab exercise is due no later than one week after it is assigned. Late assignments will receive a maximum of half credit.

    Lab Book Exercises must be turned in on the actual lab book pages, or photo-copies of these pages.
    They will NOT be accepted on loose-leaf paper.

    ATTENDANCE:
    Attendance is required. A grade will be given at the end of the class based on attendance. This attendance grade will be worth 50 points, reduced by one point for every absence, without regard to the reason for the absence. It is the student's responsibility to arrange for any make-up work.

    MAGAZINE SUMMARY ASSIGNMENT:
    Each student is required to turn in a brief summary of a magazine or internet article, worth 50 points, due on or before March 21st. The procedure for this assignment is as follows:
    1. Choose a magazine or internet article on a topic of interest to you that relates to any of the topics covered in this class, written in the last 5 years. The NMSU-C library can be a great resource to help with this, or choose from one of the suggested magazines below.
    2. Write a summary of this article, in your own words, that is from 1 to 1-1/2 pages in length, typed. Include your impressions and opinions about what was contained in it.
    3. Include information about the source of your article, such as the magazine name, date, issue, URL, etc.

    SUGGESTED MAGAZINES: **
    Arizona Highways
    Discover
    National Geographic
    Natural History
    New Mexico
    Newsweek
    Science News
    Scientific American
    Smithsonian
    Time
    U.S. News & World Report

    ** This list is not exclusive. Any other magazine with a relevant article will do. If you are not sure about your article - ASK!


    STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES:
    If you have or believe you have a disability, we encourage you to contact the Special Needs Office at this college at your earliest convenience to self-identify. Once that office is provided with the disability supportive documentation needed, the Special-Needs Services Coordinator can then begin to arrange the types of appropriate accommodations that might be required. The Special-Needs Office is located in Room 2F across from the Learning Assistance Center. You may call 234-9317 (234-9323 TDD) to make an appointment.

    If you have a condition which may affect your ability to exit safely from the premises in an emergency or which may cause an emergency during class, you are encouraged to discuss this in confidence with the instructor and/or the Special-Needs Coordinator at the time of your appointment.

    STUDENT LEARNER OUTCOMES:
    The student will be able to:
    1. Recognize the traits of rocks and minerals in hand specimens.
    2. Describe and discuss the formation of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks.
    3. Explain Bowen's reaction series.
    4. Describe and discuss the basic principles of rock dating.
    5. Place in chronological order geologic events as seen in a cross-sectional diagram.
    6. Describe and discuss the theories of continental drift and plate tectonics.
    7. Describe and discuss the causes and effects of earthquakes.
    8. Explain the formation and effects of volcanoes.
    9. Identify the different types of igneous intrusions.
    10. Describe and discuss the processes of crustal deformation.
    11. Recognize the various structures formed by crustal deformation.
    12. Recognize the various structures formed by crustal deformation as they would be seen in surface outcrop.
    13. Describe and discuss the processes of weathering.
    14. Explain the processes of stream erosion and identify the features formed by them.
    15. Describe and discuss the processes of mass wasting.
    16. Describe and discuss the occurrence of ground water and the landforms created by it.
    17. Describe and discuss the processes of glacial erosion and the landforms created by glaciers.

TENTATIVE COURSE OUTLINE
and
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
Geology 111G

Subject Text Chapter Review Questions
Introduction 1 1,4,6,11,12,13
Minerals 2 2,6,7,9,12,15,16,17
Plate Tectonics 16 4,9,10,11,12,13,15,16,18,20,21
TEST #1
Igneous Rocks 3 2,4,5,6,7,8,10
Igneous Activity 4 1,4,5,6,10,16,17,19,23,24,25
Earthquakes 15 1,7,8,9,12,13,19,20,22
TEST #2
Weathering and Soils 5 3,5,6,7,10
Sedimentary Rocks 6 2,3,8,10,11,13,15,16
Metamorphic Rocks 7 1,2,3,6,7,8
TEST #3
Mountain Building 17 5,6,9,11,15,16,19
Geologic Time 18 1,2,3,4,5,6,14,15,20
Mass Wasting 8 2,3,5,9,10,12
TEST #4
Running Water 9 3,4,8,9,11,13
Groundwater 10 5,6,7,8,10,15,17,18,19
Glaciers 11 3,6,8,9,11,13,14,17
TEST #5: Wednesday, May 2nd
FINAL EXAM: Wednesday, May 9th (optional)


TENTATIVE SCHEDULE
Geology 111G
SPRING 2001

Date Day Lecture Laboratory
1/10 W Syllabus
GEODe
1/15 M Martin Luther King Day - No School
1/17 W Introduction
Minerals
Continental Drift
Mineral Observations
1/22 M Minerals Mineral Lab Book Questions
1/24 W Minerals
Plate Tectonics
Silicate Minerals
1/29 M Plate Tectonics Non-Silicate Minerals
1/31 W Plate Tectonics Plate Boundaries
2/5 M Igneous Rocks North Pacific
2/7 W Test #1
Chapters Due: 1, 2, 16
2/12 M Igneous Rocks
Volcanoes
Igneous Rocks
2/14 W Volcanoes Mt. Pinatubo
2/19 M Volcanoes
Earthquakes
Mt. St. Helens
2/21 W Earthquakes Seismographs
2/26 M Earthquakes Epicenter Location
2/28 W Test #2
Chapters due: 3, 4, 15
3/5 M Sedimentary Rocks Internet
3/7 W Sedimentary Rocks Sedimentary Rocks
3/12 M Metamorphic Rocks Metamorphic Rocks
3/14 W Weathering Geologic Cross-Sections
3/19 M Test #3
Chapters Due: 5, 6, 7
3/21 W Crustal Deformation
Magazine Summaries Due
Structural Exercises
3/26 M-W SPRING BREAK
4/2 M Crustal Deformation Structural Exercises
4/4 W Geologic Time Structural Exercises
4/9 M Geologic Time Structural Exercises
4/11 W Mass Wasting Structural Review
4/16 M Test #4
Chapters Due: 17, 18, 8
4/18 W Streams New Mexico Geologic Maps
4/23 M Streams
Ground Water
Stream Tables
4/25 W Ground Water
Glaciers
Ground Water
4/30 M Glaciers Caves of the Guadalupes
5/2 W Test #5
Chapters Due: 9, 10, 11
5/9 W Comprehensive Final Exam - (Optional)



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